Corneal Transplant

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the benefits of corneal transplant surgery?

The primary benefit of corneal transplantation is total restoration of vision.

What are the risks of corneal transplant surgery?

The risks of corneal transplantation include:

  • Astigmatism, which can be caused by a ripple in the tissue during surgery. Corrective lenses may be needed to correct this problem.
  • Glaucoma (high pressure in the eye that can cause vision loss).
  • Sometimes, the body rejects the corneal tissue. Medication is given to the patient after the transplant surgery to help their body accept the corneal tissue. In a small number of patients, however, the body rejects the donor cornea, resulting in cloudy vision. If rejection does occur, a second transplant can be performed.
  • Blindness if the surgery is not successful.

Your doctor will discuss the risks of corneal transplantation with you further.

Who’s eligible for a corneal transplant?

To determine who is a good candidate for a corneal transplant, the patient must be evaluated. Patients are considered suitable if they have considerable corneal deterioration. Patients are usually referred for a transplant by their ophthalmologist and are scheduled for a corneal consultation with us if the physician suspects corneal damage.

How do I know if I have corneal deterioration?

Your vision will be cloudy; you will not be able to see clearly through the affected eye.

Do I have to meet certain medical criteria to receive a donor cornea?

No, although you must otherwise be healthy enough for surgery. Patients undergoing a corneal transplant will be able to use any donated cornea. Unlike other types of transplants, corneal transplants do not require the donor and recipient to have the same blood type.

Nevertheless, sometimes the body rejects the foreign tissue. Anti-rejection medication is given to the patient after the transplant surgery to help their body accept the corneal tissue. If rejection does occur, a second transplant can be performed.

Who are the donors?

Donors are deceased individuals who, prior to death, agreed to donate their organs. Scott & White coordinates with eye banks, such as the Lonestar Lion’s Eye Bank in Manor, Texas, to secure corneas for transplantation.


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