Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP)

Prevention of Post-Surgical Infections

With surgery, one of the biggest concerns is post-surgical infection. These infections can raise the risk of complications after surgery. These measures show what Scott & White is doing to decrease your risk of post-surgical infections.

Administering Timely Medication

What are we measuring?

The percent of surgery patients who receive preventative antibiotics within one hour prior to surgical incision.

Why is this important?

Patients can develop infections when they have surgery. Hospitals try to prevent infections by giving patients a preventative antibiotic shortly before surgery begins.

Reducing Risks Associated with Antibiotics

What are we measuring?

The percent of surgery patients whose preventative antibiotic(s) are stopped within 24 hours after surgery ends.

Why is this important?

In most cases, it is not necessary to continue antibiotics for more than 24 hours after surgery. Administering antibiotics beyond 24 hours increases the risk of side effects. It can also cause bacteria to become resistant to the medication.

Selecting Appropriate Antibiotics

What are we measuring?

The percent of surgery patients who receive the appropriate antibiotics.

Why is this important?

The appropriateness of an antibiotic depends on each individual patient and the type of procedure being performed. By selecting and administering antibiotics that meet current guidelines, hospitals can reduce the risk of an infection after surgery.

Beta Blocker Continuation

What are we measuring?

Surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were kept on the beta blockers during the period just before and after their surgery.

Why is this important?

Although many medications are stopped prior to surgery, patients who have been taking beta blockers can develop heart problems if they suddenly stop taking them. Staying on beta blockers before and after
surgery makes it less likely that they will have heart problems.

Post Operative Glucose Control

What are we measuring?

Heart surgery patients whose blood sugar (blood glucose) is kept under good control during the two days following surgery.

Why is this important?

Keeping heart surgery patients’ blood sugar under good control after surgery lowers the risk of infection and other problems, even in those who do not have diabetes.

Appropriate Hair Removal

What are we measuring?

Surgery patients needing hair removed from the surgical area, and had it done using a safer method (electric clippers or hair removal cream – not a razor).

Why is this important?

Preparing a patient for surgery may include removing body hair from skin in the area where the surgery will be done. Research has shown that shaving with a razor can increase the risk of infection. It is safer to use electric clippers or hair removal cream.

Urinary Catheter Removal Post Operative Day 1 OR 2

What are we measuring?

Surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery.

Why is this important?

Surgical patients often need a urinary catheter to help drain the urine from their bladder. Patients can develop infections when urinary catheters are left in place too long after surgery. To help prevent
infection, most patients should have their urinary catheters removed within two days following surgery.

Temperature Management During Surgery

What are we measuring?

Patients having surgery who were warmed in the operating room or whose body temperature was near normal by the end of surgery.

Why is this important?

Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections and other complications by keeping the patient’s body temperature near normal during surgery. Patients whose body temperatures drop during surgery have a
greater risk of infection and their wounds may not heal as quickly.

Recommended Venous Thromboembolism Therapy ordered

What are we measuring?

Surgery patients whose doctors ordered treatment to prevent blood clots (venous thromboembolism) after certain types of surgeries.

Why is this important?

Certain surgeries can increase the risk of a blood clot forming. When surgery patients do not move for a long period of time, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis.
If the blood clot gets into the lung, it can cause serious problems.

To help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery, doctors can order treatments designed to prevent clots. These treatments include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings, or mechanical air stockings.

Thromboembolism Prevention Therapy Administered within 24 hours

What are we measuring?

Patients who got treatment at the right time (within 24 hours before or after their surgery) to help prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery.

Why is this important?

Certain surgeries can increase the risk of a blood clot forming. When surgery patients do not move for a long period of time, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis.
If the blood clot gets into the lung, it can cause serious problems.

Treatments to help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings, or mechanical air stockings. The risk of blood clots is reduced if the treatment is started 24 hours before surgery begins to 24 hours after surgery ends.

Performing Blood Cultures

What are we measuring?
Percent of pneumonia patients having blood cultures drawn prior to their first antibiotic in the hospital.

Why is this important?
Different types of bacteria can cause pneumonia. Hospitals should complete a blood culture test to attempt to determine which bacteria may have caused pneumonia and to determine which antibiotic will work best. Blood cultures do not always show the bacteria, but positive blood cultures will help determine how to best treat the pneumonia and if any precautions are necessary to prevent the spread of illness.

Choosing Appropriate Antibiotics

What are we measuring?
Percent of pneumonia patients given the correct antibiotics upon arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?
Pneumonia is treated with antibiotics. Hospitals should choose the antibiotics that best treat the type of bacteria causing the infection for each pneumonia patient.

Administering Timely Medication

What are we measuring?
The percent of pneumonia patients that receive antibiotics within six hours of arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?
Patients who have pneumonia caused by bacteria need to receive antibiotics as soon as possible. Timely administration of antibiotics reduces the risk of serious complications.

Pneumococcal Vaccinations

What are we measuring?
The percent of pneumonia patients 65 years and older who were assessed and given the pneumococcal vaccine, if indicated.

Why is this important?
The pneumococcal vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of a serious pneumonia infections. Inpatient hospitalization represents an opportunity to provide screening and immunization against pneumonia, and possibly prevent future admissions to the hospital.

Influenza (Flu) Vaccinations

What are we measuring?
The percent of pneumonia patients 50 years and older who were assessed and given the flu vaccine, if indicated. This measure only applies to patients hospitalized October through February.

Why is this important?
The flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of a catching the flu. Inpatient hospitalization represents an opportunity to provide screening and immunization against the flu.

Advice to Stop Smoking

What are we measuring?
Percent of pneumonia patients given smoking cessation advice and counseling.

Why is this important?
Patients who stop smoking have a better prognosis than those who do not quit. Hospitals can help patients reduce their risk of future pneumonia and improve their condition by counseling them to stop smoking.


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