Outpatient Acute Myocardial Infarction (OP AMI)

Appropriate and Timely Treatment for Heart Attack

When the blood flow in the arteries to the heart is completely blocked, part of the heart muscle dies. This causes an acute myocardial infarction (heart attack).

Administering Aspirin on Arrival

What are we measuring?

The percentage of outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who receive an aspirin within 24 hours of arrival.

Why is this important?

Aspirin is an inexpensive, safe, and effective treatment for heart attack. Aspirin is not appropriate for all patients, but it can help keep blood clots from forming and dissolve blood clots that can cause heart
attacks.

Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival

What are we measuring?

The percent of patients who experienced a heart attack and got a clot busting medication within 30 minutes of arrival to the Emergency Department, before being transferred. Clot busting medications are also known as fibrinolytics. Note: this measure pertains to patients in hospitals that do not have the ability to perform percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 90 minutes.

Why is this important?

In hospitals that do not have percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capabilities, fibrinolytic medications can be given to open the clogged artery. This increases blood flow to the heart and reduces heart damage. Delivering fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes has been shown to have a positive impact for patients with certain types of heart attacks.

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who needed specialized care were transferred to another hospital

What are we measuring?

This measure shows how long it takes, on average, for hospitals who do not provide specialized heart attack care to transfer the patient to another hospital for specialized heart attack care.

Why is this important?

If a hospital does not have the facilities to provide specialized heart attack care, it transfers possible heart attack patients to another hospital that can give them this care. The faster the hospital transfers the
patient, the more quickly the patient can receive the care they need.

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack got an ECG (electrocardiogram)

What are we measuring?

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a test that can help doctors know whether patients are having a heart attack. This measure tells the average number of minutes it takes between patients arriving to the Emergency Department and receiving an ECG.

Why is this important?

Standards of care say that patients with chest pain or a possible heart attack should have an ECG upon arrival, preferably within 10 minutes. This helps the doctors to begin appropriate treatment for the heart attack as quickly as possible.

Performing Blood Cultures

What are we measuring?

Percent of pneumonia patients having blood cultures drawn prior to their first antibiotic in the hospital.

Why is this important?

Different types of bacteria can cause pneumonia. Hospitals should complete a blood culture test to attempt to determine which bacteria may have caused pneumonia and to determine which antibiotic will work best. Blood cultures do not always show the bacteria, but positive blood cultures will help determine how to best treat the pneumonia and if any precautions are necessary to prevent the spread of illness.

Choosing Appropriate Antibiotics

What are we measuring?

Percent of pneumonia patients given the correct antibiotics upon arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?

Pneumonia is treated with antibiotics. Hospitals should choose the antibiotics that best treat the type of bacteria causing the infection for each pneumonia patient.

Administering Timely Medication

What are we measuring?

The percent of pneumonia patients that receive antibiotics within six hours of arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?

Patients who have pneumonia caused by bacteria need to receive antibiotics as soon as possible. Timely administration of antibiotics reduces the risk of serious complications.

Pneumococcal Vaccinations

What are we measuring?

The percent of pneumonia patients 65 years and older who were assessed and given the pneumococcal vaccine, if indicated.

Why is this important?

The pneumococcal vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of a serious pneumonia infections. Inpatient hospitalization represents an opportunity to provide screening and immunization against pneumonia, and possibly prevent future admissions to the hospital.

Influenza (Flu) Vaccinations

What are we measuring?

The percent of pneumonia patients 50 years and older who were assessed and given the flu vaccine, if indicated. This measure only applies to patients hospitalized October through February.

Why is this important?

The flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of a catching the flu. Inpatient hospitalization represents an opportunity to provide screening and immunization against the flu.

Advice to Stop Smoking

What are we measuring?

Percent of pneumonia patients given smoking cessation advice and counseling.

Why is this important?

Patients who stop smoking have a better prognosis than those who do not quit. Hospitals can help patients reduce their risk of future pneumonia and improve their condition by counseling them to stop smoking.


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