Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)

Appropriate and Timely Treatment for Heart Attack

When the blood flow in the arteries to the heart is completely blocked, part of the heart muscle dies. This causes an acute myocardial infarction (heart attack).

Administering Aspirin on Arrival

What are we measuring?

The percentage of patients who receive an aspirin on arrival at the hospital.

Why is this important?

Aspirin is an inexpensive, safe, and effective treatment for heart attack. While not appropriate for all patients, aspirin can help keep blood clots from forming and dissolve blood clots that can cause heart attacks.

Prescribing ACE Inhibitors and ARBs on Discharge

What are we measuring?

The percentage of patients who receive an ACE Inhibitor or ARB on discharge.

Why is this important?

Heart attack patients benefit from the use of medicines known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) Inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) to treat heart attacks, heart failure, or a decreased function of the heart. These medicines block a hormone in the body that is responsible for causing the blood vessels to narrow. They can significantly reduce the risk of death after a heart attack.

Administering Aspirin at Discharge

What are we measuring?

The percentage of patients diagnosed with a heart attack who are given aspirin at discharge.

Why is this important?

Aspirin is an inexpensive, safe, and effective way to help reduce the risk of heart attack for some patients. Scientific studies show that taking aspirin may help prevent further heart attacks (aspirin is not appropriate for all patients). The risk of heart attacks is reduced when hospitals give patients aspirin when they leave the hospital.

Administering Beta Blockers at Discharge

What are we measuring?

The percent of patients diagnosed with a heart attack who are given beta blockers at discharge.

Why is this important?

Hospitals can help reduce the risk of another heart attack by giving discharged patients beta blockers. Beta blockers are a type of medicine used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain (angina) and heart failure. Use of beta blockers can also help prevent a future heart attack.

Administering Lipid Lowering Medications at Discharge

What are we measuring?

The percent of patients with a heart attack who were given lipid lowering medications at discharge.

Why is this important?

Hospitals can help improve patient’s survival following a heart attack by giving lipid lowering medications at discharge. Lipid lowering medications are used to lower cholesterol.

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention within 90 minutes

What are we measuring?

Percent of heart attack patients who had a clogged heart artery and received a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 90 minutes of arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?

Percutaneous coronary interventions are designed to open clogged arteries. This procedure increases blood flow to the heart and reduces heart damage. Performing a percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes has been shown to have a positive impact on outcomes for patients with certain types of heart attacks.

Heart attack patients given fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes of arrival

What are we measuring?

Percent of heart attack patients with a clogged artery who receive a fibrinolytic (clot busting) medication within 30 minutes of arrival to the hospital.

Why is this important?

Not all hospitals have the capability of performing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Instead, fibrinolytic medications can be given to open the clogged artery. This therapy increases blood flow to the heart and reduces heart damage. Administering fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes has been shown to improve outcomes for patients with certain types of heart attacks.


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