Transurethral Resection, Bladder Tumor

A cancerous growth (tumor) can develop on the inside wall of the bladder. The bladder is the organ that holds urine. One way to remove the tumor is a procedure called a transurethral resection. The tumor is removed (resected) through the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body (urethra). No cuts (incisions) are made in the skin. Instead, the procedure is done through a thin telescope, called a resectoscope. Attached to it is a light and usually a tiny camera. The resectoscope is put into the urethra. In men, the urethra opens at the end of the penis. In women, it opens just above the vagina.

A transurethral resection is usually used to remove tumors that have not gotten too big or too deep. These are called Stage 0, Stage 1 or Stage 2 bladder cancers.

LET YOUR CAREGIVER KNOW ABOUT:

On the day of the procedure, your caregivers will need to know the last time you had anything to eat or drink. This includes water, gum, and candy. In advance, make sure they know about:

RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS

This is usually a safe procedure. Every procedure has risks, though. For a transurethral resection, they include:

BEFORE THE PROCEDURE

PROCEDURE

AFTER THE PROCEDURE

PROGNOSIS