Temporal Artery Biopsy

Blood vessels that carry blood from the heart to all parts of the body are called arteries. Arteries in your temples (the area on the side of the head, between the ears and eyes) are called temporal arteries. The lining of a temporal artery can swell up. The condition is called temporal arteritis. Another term is giant cell arteritis. It usually causes a headache or pain in the temples. But it can also cause fever. Your jaws can hurt when you chew. Or, you could have trouble seeing. These symptoms could be caused by something else. The way to be sure is to do a temporal artery biopsy. A small piece of the artery is removed. Then it is checked under a microscope.

LET YOUR CAREGIVER KNOW ABOUT:

RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS

Problems are rare with a temporal artery biopsy. However, every procedure has risks. For this type of biopsy, they include:

BEFORE THE PROCEDURE

PROCEDURE

AFTER THE PROCEDURE

PROGNOSIS

This procedure is not a treatment. It will not cure temporal arteritis. The biopsy is done to help your caregiver decide if you have the condition. If you do, treatment can begin. Treatment for temporal arteritis is almost always successful.