Mid-Back Strain

with Rehab

A strain is an injury in which a tendon or muscle is torn. The muscles and tendons of the mid-back are vulnverable to strains. However, these muscles and tendons are very strong and require a great force to be injured. The muscles of the mid-back are responsible for stabilizing the spinal column, as well as spinal twisting (rotation). Strains are classified into three categories. Grade 1 strains cause pain, but the tendon is not lengthened. Grade 2 strains include a lengthened ligament, due to the ligament being stretched or partially ruptured. With grade 2 strains there is still function, although the function may be decreased. Grade 3 strains involve a complete tear of the tendon or muscle, and function is usually impaired.

SYMPTOMS

CAUSES

Mid-back strains occur when a force is placed on the muscles or tendons that is greater than they can handle. Common causes of injury include:

RISK INCREASES WITH:

PREVENTION

PROGNOSIS

If treated properly, mid-back strains usually heal within 6 weeks.

RELATED COMPLICATIONS

TREATMENT

Treatment first involves the use of ice and medicine, to reduce pain and inflammation. As the pain begins to subside, you may begin strengthening and stretching exercises to improve body posture and sport technique. These exercises may be performed at home or with a therapist. Severe injuries may require referral to a therapist for further evaluation and treatment, such as ultrasound. Corticosteroid injections may be given to help reduce inflammation. Biofeedback (watching monitors of your body processes) and psychotherapy may also be prescribed. Prolonged bed rest is felt to do more harm than good. Massage may help break the muscle spasms. Sometimes, an injection of cortisone, with or without local anesthetics, may be given to help relieve the pain and spasms.

MEDICATION

HEAT AND COLD:

SEEK IMMEDIATE MEDICAL CARE IF:

EXERCISES

RANGE OF MOTION (ROM) AND STRETCHING EXERCISES - Mid-Back Strain

These exercises may help you when beginning to rehabilitate your injury. In order to successfully resolve your symptoms, you must improve your posture. These exercises are designed to help reduce the forward-head and rounded-shoulder posture which contributes to this condition. Your symptoms may resolve with or without further involvement from your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer. While completing these exercises, remember:

STRETECH - Axial Extension

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

RANGE OF MOTION- Upper Thoracic Extension

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

RANGE OF MOTION- Mid-Thoracic Extension

Repeat exercise __________ times, __________ times per day.

STRENGTHENING EXERCISES - Mid-Back Strain

These exercises may help you when beginning to rehabilitate your injury. They may resolve your symptoms with or without further involvement from your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer. While completing these exercises, remember:

STRENGTHENING – Quadruped, Opposite UE/LE Lift

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

STRENGTH - Shoulder Extensors

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

STRENGTH - Horizontal Abductors

Choose one of the two positions to complete this exercise.

Prone: lying on stomach:

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

Standing:

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

STRENGTH - Scapular Retractors and External Rotators, Rowing

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

POSTURE AND BODY MECHANICS CONSIDERATIONS – Mid-Back Strain

Keeping correct posture when sitting, standing or completing your activities will reduce the stress put on different body tissues, allowing injured tissues a chance to heal and limiting painful experiences. The following are general guidelines for improved posture. Your physician or physical therapist will provide you with any instructions specific to your needs. While reading these guidelines, remember:

PROPER SITTING POSTURE

In order to minimize stress and discomfort on your spine, you must sit with correct posture. Sitting with good posture should be effortless for a healthy body. Returning to good posture is a gradual process. Many people can work toward this most comfortably by using various supports until they have the flexibility and strength to maintain this posture on their own.

When sitting with proper posture, your ears will fall over your shoulders and your shoulders will fall over your hips. You should use the back of the chair to support your upper back. Your lower back will be in a neutral position, just slightly arched. You may place a small pillow or folded towel at the base of your low back for

support.

When working at a desk, create an environment that supports good, upright posture. Without extra support, muscles fatigue and lead to excessive strain on joints and other tissues. Keep these recommendations in mind:

CHAIR:

BODY POSITION

INCORRECT SITTING POSTURES

If you are feeling tired and unable to assume a healthy sitting posture, do not slouch or slump. This puts excessive strain on your back tissues, causing more damage and pain. Healthier options include:

CORRECT STANDING POSTURES

Proper standing posture should be assumed with all daily activities, even if they only take a few moments, like when brushing your teeth. As in sitting, your ears should fall over your shoulders and your shoulders should fall over your hips. You should keep a slight tension in your abdominal muscles to brace your spine. Your tailbone should point down to the ground, not behind your body, resulting in an over-extended swayback posture.

INCORRECT STANDING POSTURES

Common incorrect standing postures include a forward head, locked knees, and an excessive swayback.

WALKING

Walk with an upright posture. Your ears, shoulders and hips should all line-up.

CORRECT LIFTING TECHNIQUES

DO :

INCORRECT LIFTING TECHNIQUES

DO NOT: