MRI Angiography (MRA)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a test that lets your doctor see detailed pictures of the inside of your body without using X-rays. Instead, strong magnets and radio waves work together in a magnetic field to form very detailed and sharp images which are produced by a computer and viewed on a TV monitor. These can be viewed in two and three dimensional forms. There is no x-ray radiation and the magnets and radio waves are harmless. When the studies are done on your blood vessels, it is known as MR angiography (MRA). MRA uses MRI technology to help in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disorders, stroke, and blood vessel diseases. MRA can provide detailed images of blood vessels without using contrast materials. Contrast materials are a material given intravenously (through the veins) which show up on x-rays or MRI's. Special forms of contrast material may be used to make MRI images (pictures) even more clear.

LET YOUR CAREGIVERS KNOW ABOUT:

(Note: The magnet used in MRI can cause metal objects in your body to move.)

RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS

BEFORE THE PROCEDURE

MRI uses strong magnets, so you will be asked to remove your watch, jewelry, and other metal objects. Some makeup also contains traces of metal, so you may have to remove that, too. Braces and fillings normally are not a problem. An MRI test may take up to an hour. Please check in 15 minutes before your test is scheduled or as instructed. Follow any instructions you were given to prepare for the test.

PROCEDURE

AFTER THE PROCEDURE

BENEFITS OF MRA

LIMITATIONS OF MRA