Diagnostic Services for Specific Neuroendocrine Tumors of the GI Tract

At Scott & White Healthcare, we use state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment to help identify and evaluate your tumors with clarity and precision.

In addition to general diagnostic tests, if your physician suspects you may have a specific NET,  he or she may recommend one or more of the following tests for the particular neuroendocrine tumor of the GI tract under consideration.

Gastrinoma

  • Fasting blood gastrin test. Measures the amount of gastrin in your blood after you’ve fasted for at least 8 hours.
  • Gastric acid secretion test
  • Secretin stimulation test
  • Selective pancreatic arteriogram and secretin stimulation. Measures the amount of gastrin in your blood at set intervals after secretin is infused. This specialized test is performed by your interventional radiologist at the time of pancreatic angiography.
  • Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (OctreoScan). In this scan, radioactive octreotide (similar to your body’s somatostatin) is injected into your bloodstream; it attaches to the protein on the tumor cells of gastrinomas. A gamma camera (a special radiation-detecting device) placed in front of your abdomen measures radiation. The octreotide will reveal the presence of gastrinomas.

Insulinoma

  • Fasting blood glucose and insulin tests. Measure the amount of glucose and insulin in your blood after you’ve fasted for at least 8 hours. Other important blood markers including C-peptide, proinsulin and insulin antibodies may also be measured.
  • Venous sampling. Blood samples are taken from the veins coming out of your pancreas to measure the amounts of pancreatic hormones. Elevated levels of hormones may indicate an insulinoma. By checking each vein individually, your physician is able to identify the location of your tumor.

Gluconoma

  • Fasting blood glucagon test. Measures the amount of glucagon in your blood after you’ve fasted for at least 8 hours.

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Ppoma

  • Fasting blood polypeptide test. Measures the amount of pancreatic polypeptide in your blood after you’ve fasted for at least 8 hours.
  • Somatastatin receptor scintigraphy (OctreoScan). In this scan, radioactive octreotide (similar to your body’s somatostatin) is injected into your bloodstream; it attaches to the protein on the tumor cells of neuroendocrine tumors of the GI tract. A gamma camera (a special radiation-detecting device) placed in front of your abdomen measures radiation. The octreotide will reveal the presence of Ppomas.

Somatostatinoma

  • Fasting blood somatostatin test. Measures the amount of somatostatin in your blood after you’ve fasted for at least 8 hours.
  • Somatastatin receptor scintigraphy (OctreoScan). In this scan, radioactive octreotide (similar to your body’s somatostatin) is injected into your bloodstream; it attaches to the protein on the tumor cells of neuroendocrine cells. A gamma camera (a special radiation-detecting device) placed in front of your abdomen measures radiation. The octreotide will reveal the presence of somatostatinomas.

VIPoma

  • Blood chemistry studies. Measure the amount of potassium and other substances released by organs and tissues in your blood. Decreased levels of potassium may indicate a VIPoma.
  • Serum VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide test). Measures the amount of VIP in your blood.
  • Stool analysis. Measures the amount of sodium and potassium in your stool.  Elevated levels may indicate a VIPoma.

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