Unilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy

Care After

Please read the instructions outlined below. Refer to this sheet for the next few weeks. These instructions provide you with general information on caring for yourself after you leave the hospital. Your caregiver may also give you specific instructions. While your treatment has been planned according to the most current medical practices available, unavoidable problems may occur. If you have any problems or questions after you leave, call your caregiver.

HOME CARE INSTRUCTIONS

  • It is normal to be sore for a week or two. Call your caregiver if the pain is getting worse or the pain medication is not helping.

  • Have help when you go home for a week or so to help with the household chores.

  • Follow your caregiver's advice regarding diet.

  • Get rest and sleep.

  • Only take over-the-counter or prescription medicines for pain or discomfort as directed by your caregiver.

  • Do not take aspirin. It can cause bleeding.

  • Do not drive, exercise or lift anything over 5 pounds.

  • Do not drink alcohol until your caregiver gives you permission.

  • Do not lift anything over 5 pounds.

  • Do not have sexual intercourse until your caregiver says it is OK.

  • Take your temperature twice a day and write it down.

  • Change the bandage (dressing) as directed.

  • Make and keep your follow-up appointments for postoperative care.

  • If you become constipated, ask your caregiver about taking a mild laxative. Drinking more liquids than usual and eating bran foods can help prevent constipation.

SEEK MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You have swelling or redness around the cut (incision).

  • You develop a rash.

  • You have side effects from the medication.

  • You feel lightheaded.

  • You need more or stronger medication.

  • You have pain, swelling or redness where the IV (intravenous) was placed.

SEEK IMMEDIATE MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You develop an unexplained temperature above 100° F (37.8° C).

  • You develop increasing belly (abdominal) pain.

  • You have pus coming out of the incision.

  • You notice a bad smell coming from the wound or dressing.

  • The incision is separating.

  • There is excessive vaginal bleeding.

  • You start to feel sick to your stomach (nauseous) and vomit.

  • You have leg or chest pain.

  • You have pain when you urinate.

  • You develop shortness of breath.

  • You pass out.

MAKE SURE YOU:

  • Understand these instructions.

  • Will watch your condition.

  • Will get help right away if you are not doing well or get worse.