Triceps Tendinitis

with Rehab

ExitCare ImageTriceps tendinitis usually results in a ligament sprain (tear). The triceps tendon attaches the elbow to the triceps muscle on the back of the arm. It prevents the elbow from bending too far outward. Sprains are classified into three categories. Grade 1 sprains cause pain, but the tendon is not lengthened. Grade 2 sprains include a lengthened ligament due to the ligament being stretched or partially ruptured. With grade 2 sprains there is still function, although the function may be diminished. Grade 3 sprains are characterized by a complete tear of the tendon or muscle and function is usually impaired.

SYMPTOMS

  • Pain, tenderness, swelling, and/or bruising over the site of injury (contusion).

  • Pain that worsens with elbow movement, such as push-ups.

  • A "pop" or tear felt or heard at the time of injury.

  • Decreased elbow function and/or grip strength.

CAUSES

  • Overuse of triceps muscles and tendons.

  • Injury, laceration or direct blow to the triceps tendon.

RISK INCREASES WITH:

  • Activities in which falling is likely.

  • Weightlifting and push-ups.

  • Poor strength and flexibility.

  • Steroid use.

PREVENTION

  • Warm up and stretch properly before activity.

  • Maintain physical fitness:

  • Strength, flexibility, and endurance.

  • Cardiovascular fitness.

  • Learn and use proper technique. When possible, have coach correct improper technique.

  • Functional braces may be effective in preventing injury, especially re-injury, in contact sports.

PROGNOSIS

Triceps sprains usually heal in 6 weeks with proper treatment and rest.

RELATED COMPLICATIONS

  • Tendon rupture requiring surgery.

  • Loss of motion in the elbow

  • Prolonged healing time, if improperly treated or re-injured.

TREATMENT

Treatment initially involves resting from any activities that aggravate the symptoms, and the use of ice and medications to help reduce pain and inflammation. Referral to a therapist for further evaluation and treatment may be enough for a full recovery. If rehabilitation alone is insufficient for resolving the injury, then surgery may be necessary to use other tissue to recreate (reconstruct) the torn tendon. After surgery, immobilization of the elbow is necessary to allow for healing. After immobilization it is important to perform strengthening and stretching exercises to help regain strength and a full range of motion. These exercises may be completed at home or with a therapist. Your therapist will decide when you may return to sports.

MEDICATION

  • If pain medication is necessary, then nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, or other minor pain relievers, such as acetaminophen, are often recommended.

  • Do not take pain medication for 7 days before surgery.

  • Prescription pain relievers may be given if deemed necessary by your caregiver. Use only as directed and only as much as you need.

HEAT AND COLD

  • Cold treatment (icing) relieves pain and reduces inflammation. Cold treatment should be applied for 10 to 15 minutes every 2 to 3 hours for inflammation and pain and immediately after any activity that aggravates your symptoms. Use ice packs or massage the area with a piece of ice (ice massage).

  • Heat treatment may be used prior to performing the stretching and strengthening activities prescribed by your caregiver, physical therapist, or athletic trainer. Use a heat pack or soak your injury in warm water.

SEEK MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • Treatment seems to offer no benefit, or the condition worsens.

  • Any medications produce adverse side effects.

  • Any complications from surgery occur:

  • Pain, numbness, or coldness in the extremity operated upon.

  • Discoloration of the nail beds (they become blue or gray) of the extremity operated upon.

  • Signs of infections (fever, pain, inflammation, redness, or persistent bleeding).

EXERCISES

RANGE OF MOTION (ROM) AND STRETCHING EXERCISES - Triceps Tendinitis

These exercises may help you when beginning to rehabilitate your injury. Your symptoms may resolve with or without further involvement from your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer. While completing these exercises, remember:

  • Restoring tissue flexibility helps normal motion to return to the joints. This allows healthier, less painful movement and activity.

  • An effective stretch should be held for at least 30 seconds.

  • A stretch should never be painful. You should only feel a gentle lengthening or release in the stretched tissue.

ExitCare Image RANGE OF MOTION – Flexion

  • Hold your right / left arm at your side and bend your elbow as far as you can using your right / left arm muscles.

  • Bend the right / left elbow farther by gently pushing up on your forearm until you feel a gentle stretch on the outside of your elbow. Hold this position for __________ seconds.

  • Slowly return to the starting position.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

ExitCare Image RANGE OF MOTION – Elbow Flexion, Supine

  • Lie on your back. Extend your right / left arm into the air, bracing it with your opposite hand. Allow your right / left arm to relax.

  • Let your elbow bend, allowing your hand fall slowly toward your chest.

  • You should feel a gentle stretch along the back of your upper arm and/or elbow. Your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer may ask you to hold a __________ hand weight to increase the intensity of this stretch.

  • Hold for __________ seconds. Slowly return your right / left arm to the upright position.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

ExitCare Image STRETCH – Elbow Flexors

  • Lie on a firm bed or countertop on your back. Be sure that you are in a comfortable position which will allow you to relax your arm muscles.

  • Place a folded towel under your upper arm so that your elbow and shoulder are at the same height. Extend your arm; your elbow should not rest on the bed or towel

  • Allow the weight of your hand to straighten your elbow. Keep your arm and chest muscles relaxed. Your caretaker may ask you to increase the intensity of your stretch by adding a small wrist or hand weight.

  • Hold for __________ seconds. You should feel a stretch on the inside of your elbow. Slowly return to the starting position.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

STRENGTHENING EXERCISES - Triceps Tendinitis

These exercises will help you regain your strength. These exercises may resolve your symptoms with or without further involvement from your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer. While completing these exercises, remember:

  • Muscles can gain both the endurance and the strength needed for everyday activities through controlled exercises.

  • Complete these exercises as instructed by your physician, physical therapist or athletic trainer. Progress with the resistance and repetition exercises only as your caregiver advises.

  • You may experience muscle soreness or fatigue, but the pain or discomfort you are trying to eliminate should never worsen during these exercises. If this pain does worsen, stop and make certain you are following the directions exactly. If the pain is still present after adjustments, discontinue the exercise until you can discuss the trouble with your clinician.

ExitCare Image STRENGTH - Elbow Extensors, Isometric

  • Stand or sit upright on a firm surface. Place your right / left arm so that your palm faces your abdomen and it is at the height of your waist.

  • Place your opposite hand on the underside of your forearm. Gently push up as your right / left arm resists. Push as hard as you can with both arms without causing any pain or movement at your right / left elbow. Hold this stationary position for __________ seconds.

  • Gradually release the tension in both arms. Allow your muscles to relax completely before repeating.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

ExitCare Image STRENGTH – Elbow Flexors, Supinated

  • With good posture, stand or sit on a firm chair without armrests. Allow your right / left arm to rest at your side with your palm facing forward.

  • Holding a __________ weight or gripping a rubber exercise band/tubing, bring your hand toward your shoulder.

  • Allow your muscles to control the resistance as your hand returns to your side.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

ExitCare Image STRENGTH – Elbow Flexors, Neutral

  • With good posture, stand or sit on a firm chair without armrests. Allow your right / left arm to rest at your side with your thumb facing forward.

  • Holding a __________ weight or gripping a rubber exercise band/tubing, bring your hand toward your shoulder.

  • Allow your muscles to control the resistance as your hand returns to your side.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

ExitCare Image STRENGTH – Elbow Extensors

  • Lie on your back. Extend your right / left elbow into the air, pointing it toward the ceiling. Brace your arm with your opposite hand.*

  • Holding a __________ weight in your hand, slowly straighten your right / left elbow.

  • Allow your muscles to control the weight as your hand returns to its starting position.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.

*You may also stand with your elbow overhead and pointed toward the ceiling and supported by your opposite hand.

ExitCare Image STRENGTH - Elbow Extensors, Dynamic

  • With good posture, stand or sit on a firm chair without armrests. Keeping your upper arms at your side, bring both hands up to your right / left shoulder while gripping a rubber exercise band/tubing. Your right / left hand should be just below the other hand.

  • Straighten your right / left elbow. Hold for __________ seconds.

  • Allow your muscles to control the rubber exercise band/tubing as your hand returns to your shoulder.

Repeat __________ times. Complete this exercise __________ times per day.