Open Appendectomy

Appendectomy is surgery to remove the appendix. Open appendectomy means your surgeon uses one large cut (incision) instead of several small incisions.

LET YOUR CAREGIVER KNOW ABOUT:

  • Allergies to food or medicine.

  • Medicines taken, including vitamins, dietary supplements, herbs, eyedrops, over-the-counter medicines, and creams.

  • Use of steroids (by mouth or creams).

  • Previous problems with anesthetics or numbing medicines.

  • History of bleeding problems or blood clots.

  • Previous surgery.

  • Other health problems, including diabetes, heart problems, lung problems, and kidney problems.

  • Possibility of pregnancy, if this applies.

RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS

  • Infection. A germ starts growing in the wound. This can usually be treated with antibiotics. In some cases, the wound will need to be opened and cleaned.

  • Bleeding.

  • Damage to other organs.

  • Sores (abscesses).

  • Chronic pain at the incision sites. This is defined as pain that lasts for more than 3 months.

  • Blood clots in the legs that may rarely travel to the lungs.

  • Infection in the lungs (pneumonia).

BEFORE THE PROCEDURE

Appendectomy is usually performed immediately after an inflamed appendix (appendicitis) is diagnosed. No preparation is necessary ahead of this procedure.

PROCEDURE

You will be given medicine that makes you sleep (general anesthetic). Your surgeon will make an incision in the right, lower part of the abdomen. Your appendix will be removed. Your abdomen will be closed with stitches (sutures).

AFTER THE PROCEDURE

You will be taken to a recovery room. When the anesthesia has worn off, you will be returned to your hospital room. You will be given pain medicines to keep you comfortable. Ask your caregiver how long your hospital stay will be.