Immunization Schedule, Pediatric

In the United States, certain vaccines are recommended for children and adolescents. The childhood and adolescent recommendations include:

  • Hepatitis B vaccine.

  • Rotavirus vaccine.

  • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine.

  • Tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine.

  • Tetanus diphtheria (Td) vaccine.

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.

  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) vaccine.

  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccine.

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

  • Influenza vaccine.

  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

  • Varicella vaccine.

  • Hepatitis A vaccine.

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

  • Meningococcal vaccine.

RECOMMENDED IMMUNIZATIONS

  • Birth.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The first dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained before leaving the hospital. Infants who did not receive this birth dose should obtain the first dose as soon as possible.)

  • 1 month.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The second dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 1–2 months. The second dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • 2 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The second dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 1–2 months. The second dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Rotavirus vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose or 3-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 6 weeks of age. Immunization should not be started for infants aged 15 weeks or older.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The first dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 6 weeks of age.)

  • Hib vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series and booster dose or 3-dose series and booster dose should be obtained no earlier than 6 weeks of age.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (The first dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 6 weeks of age.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The first dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Infants who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine. The vaccine should be obtained no earlier than 6 weeks of age.)

  • 4 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses should be obtained only if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Rotavirus vaccine. (The second dose of a 2-dose or 3-dose series should be obtained. The second dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose. The final dose in a 2-dose or 3-dose series has to be obtained before 8 months of age. Immunization should not be started for infants aged 15 weeks and older.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The second dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained. The second dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Hib vaccine. (The second dose of a 2-dose series and booster dose or 3-dose series and booster dose should be obtained. The second dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (The second dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The second dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Infants who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 6 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks and at least 16 weeks after the first dose and 8 weeks after the second dose. A fourth dose is recommended when a combination vaccine is received after the birth dose. If needed, the fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks.)

  • Rotavirus vaccine. (A third dose should be obtained if any previous dose was a 3-dose series vaccine or if any previous vaccine type is unknown. If needed, the third dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the second dose. The final dose of a 2-dose or 3-dose series has to be obtained before the age of 8 months. Immunization should not be started for infants aged 15 weeks and older.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The third dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the second dose.)

  • Hib vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series and booster dose should be obtained. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the second dose.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 4 weeks after the second dose.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should obtain a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Infants who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 9 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks and at least 16 weeks after the first dose and 8 weeks after the second dose. A fourth dose is recommended when a combination vaccine is received after the birth dose. If needed, the fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hib booster. (Infants who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the Hib vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all infants and children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Infants who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 12 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks and at least 16 weeks after the first dose and 8 weeks after the second dose. A fourth dose is recommended when a combination vaccine is received after the birth dose. If needed, the fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hib booster. (One booster dose should be obtained at age 12–15 months. Children who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the Hib vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (The fourth dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months. The fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than 8 weeks after the third dose.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all infants and children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–23 months. The second dose of the 2-dose series should be obtained 6–18 months after the first dose.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 15 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks and at least 16 weeks after the first dose and 8 weeks after the second dose. A fourth dose is recommended when a combination vaccine is received after the birth dose. If needed, the fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The fourth dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained at age 15–18 months. The fourth dose may be obtained as early as 12 months if 6 months or more have passed since the third dose.)

  • Hib booster. (One booster dose should be obtained at age 12–15 months. Children who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the Hib vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (The fourth dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months. The fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than 8 weeks after the third dose. Children who have certain conditions, missed doses in the past, or obtained the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–15 months.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–23 months. The second dose of the 2-dose series should be obtained 6–18 months after the first dose.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 18 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (The third dose of a 3-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months. The third dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks, and at least 16 weeks after the first dose, and 8 weeks after the second dose. A fourth dose is recommended when a combination vaccine is received after the birth dose. If needed, the fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than age 24 weeks.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The fourth dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained at age 15–18 months. The fourth dose may be obtained as early as 12 months if 6 months or more have passed since the third dose.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Children who have certain conditions, missed doses in the past, or obtained the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The third dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 6–18 months.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose should be obtained at age 4–6 years. The second dose may be obtained before 4 years of age if that second dose is obtained at least 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose of the 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. If the second dose is obtained before 4 years of age, it is recommended that the second dose be obtained at least 3 months after the first dose.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–23 months. The second dose of the 2-dose series should be obtained 6–18 months after the first dose.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 19–23 months.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Children who have certain conditions, missed doses in the past, or obtained the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Doses obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. The second dose may be obtained before 4 years of age if that second dose is obtained at least 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. If the second dose is obtained before 4 years of age, it is recommended that the second dose be obtained at least 3 months after the first dose.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (The first dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 12–23 months. The second dose of the 2-dose series should be obtained 6–18 months after the first dose.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 2–3 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses of Hib vaccine in the past should obtain the vaccine.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Children who have certain conditions, missed doses in the past, or obtained the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Doses obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. The second dose may be obtained before 4 years of age if that second dose is obtained at least 4 weeks after the first dose.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. If the second dose is obtained before 4 years of age, it is recommended that the second dose be obtained at least 3 months after the first dose.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (Children who obtained 1 dose before age 24 months should obtain a second dose 6–18 months after the first dose. A child who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 4–6 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • DTaP vaccine. (The fifth dose of a 5-dose series should be obtained unless the fourth dose was obtained at age 4 years or older. The fifth dose should be obtained no earlier than 6 months after the fourth dose.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Children under the age of 5 years who have certain high-risk conditions or have missed doses in the past should obtain the vaccine. Children older than 5 years of age usually do not receive the vaccine. However, any unvaccinated or partially vaccinated children aged 5 years or older who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain vaccine as recommended.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Children who have certain conditions, missed doses in the past, or obtained the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (The fourth dose of a 4-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years. The fourth dose should be obtained no earlier than 6 months after the third dose.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all children should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (The second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (The second dose of a 2-dose series should be obtained at age 4–6 years.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (A child who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 7–10 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Tdap vaccine. (Individuals aged 7 years and older who are not fully immunized with the DTaP vaccine should receive 1 dose of Tdap as a catch-up vaccine. The Tdap dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine. If additional catch-up doses are required, the remaining catch-up doses should be doses of Td vaccine. The Td doses should be obtained every 10 years after the Tdap dose. Children and preteens aged 7–10 years who receive a dose of Tdap as part of the catch-up series, should not receive the recommended dose of Tdap at age 11–12 years.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Individuals older than 5 years of age usually do not receive the vaccine. However, any unvaccinated or partially vaccinated individuals aged 5 years or older who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain doses as recommended.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Children and preteens who have certain conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Children and preteens who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (Starting at age 6 months, all individuals should obtain influenza vaccine every year. Individuals between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a second dose at least 4 weeks after the first dose. Thereafter, only a single annual dose is recommended.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (A child or preteen who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • HPV vaccine. (Preteens aged 11–12 years should obtain 3 doses. The doses can be started at age 9 years. The second dose should be obtained 1–2 months after the first dose. The third dose should be obtained 24 weeks after the first dose and 16 weeks after the second dose.)

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. (Children and preteens who have certain high-risk conditions, are present during an outbreak, or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 11–12 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A preteen and an adolescent aged 11–15 years can however, obtain a 2-dose series. The second dose in a 2-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 4 months after the first dose.)

  • Tdap vaccine. (All preteens aged 11–12 years should obtain 1 dose. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine. The Tdap dose should be followed with a dose of Td vaccine every 10 years. Pregnant preteens should obtain 1 dose during each pregnancy. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose of Td or Tdap vaccine. Immunization is preferred during the 27th to 36th week of gestation.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Individuals older than 5 years of age usually do not receive the vaccine. However, any unvaccinated or partially vaccinated individuals aged 5 years or older who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain doses as recommended.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Preteens who have certain conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Preteens who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (A dose should be obtained every year.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (A preteen who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • HPV vaccine. (Start or complete the 3-dose series at age 11–12 years. The second dose should be obtained 1–2 months after the first dose. The third dose should be obtained 24 weeks after the first dose and 16 weeks after the second dose.)

  • Meningococcal vaccine. (A dose should be obtained at age 11–12 years, with a booster at age 16 years. Preteens and adolescents aged 11–18 years who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain 2 doses. Those doses should be obtained at least 8 weeks apart. Preteens who are present during an outbreak or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 13–15 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. A preteen or an adolescent aged 11–15 years can however obtain a 2-dose series. The second dose in a 2-dose series should be obtained no earlier than 4 months after the first dose.)

  • Tdap vaccine. (A preteen or an adolescent aged 11–18 years who is not fully immunized with the DTaP vaccine or has not obtained a dose of Tdap should obtain a dose of Tdap vaccine. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine. The Tdap dose should be followed with a Td dose every 10 years. Pregnant adolescents should obtain 1 dose during each pregnancy. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose. Immunization is preferred during the 27th to 36th week of gestation.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Individuals older than 5 years of age usually do not receive the vaccine. However, any unvaccinated or partially vaccinated individuals aged 5 years or older who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain doses as recommended.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Adolescents who have certain conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Adolescents who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (A dose should be obtained every year.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (An adolescent who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • HPV vaccine. (Doses should be obtained if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Meningococcal vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. Preteens and adolescents aged 11–18 years who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain 2 doses. Those doses should be obtained at least 8 weeks apart. Adolescents who are present during an outbreak or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

  • 16–18 years.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine. (Doses only obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Tdap vaccine. (A preteen or an adolescent aged 11–18 years who is not fully immunized with the DTaP vaccine or has not obtained a dose of Tdap should obtain a dose of Tdap vaccine. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine. The Tdap dose should be followed with a Td dose every 10 years. Pregnant adolescents should obtain 1 dose during each pregnancy. The dose should be obtained regardless of the length of time since the last dose. Immunization is preferred during the 27th to 36th week of gestation.)

  • Hib vaccine. (Individuals older than 5 years of age usually do not receive the vaccine. However, any unvaccinated or partially vaccinated individuals aged 5 years or older who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain doses as recommended.)

  • PCV13 vaccine. (Adolescents who have certain conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • PPSV23 vaccine. (Adolescents who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain the vaccine as recommended.)

  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine. (Individuals aged 18 years or older usually do not receive the vaccine. Individuals younger than 18 years should obtain the vaccine, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Influenza vaccine. (A dose should be obtained every year.)

  • MMR vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Varicella vaccine. (Doses obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Hepatitis A virus vaccine. (An individual who has not obtained the vaccine before 2 years of age should obtain the vaccine if he or she is at risk for infection or if hepatitis A protection is desired.)

  • HPV vaccine. (Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past.)

  • Meningococcal vaccine. (A booster should be obtained at age 16 years. Doses should be obtained, if needed, to catch up on missed doses in the past. Preteens and dolescents aged 11–18 years who have certain high-risk conditions should obtain 2 doses. Those doses should be obtained at least 8 weeks apart. Adolescents who are present during an outbreak or are traveling to a country with a high rate of meningitis should obtain the vaccine.)

The timing of immunization doses may vary. Timing and number of doses depend on when immunizations are begun and the type of vaccine that is used.