Immunization Schedule, Adult

  • Influenza vaccine.

  • Adults should be given 1 dose every year.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Td, Tdap) vaccine.

  • Adults who have not previously been given Tdap or who do not know their vaccine status should be given 1 dose of Tdap.

  • Adults should have a Td booster every 10 years.

  • Doses should be given if needed to catch up on missed doses in the past.

  • Pregnant women should be given 1 dose of Tdap vaccine during each pregnancy.

  • Varicella vaccine.

  • All adults without evidence of immunity to varicella should receive 2 doses or a second dose if they have received only 1 dose.

  • Pregnant women who do not have evidence of immunity should be given the first dose after their pregnancy.

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

  • Women aged 13 through 26 years who have not been given the vaccine previously should be given the 3 dose series. The second dose should be given 1 to 2 months after the first dose. The third dose should be given at least 24 weeks after the first dose.

  • The vaccine is not recommended for use in pregnant women. However, pregnancy testing is not needed before being given a dose. If a woman is found to be pregnant after being given a dose, no treatment is needed. In that case, the remaining doses should be delayed until after the pregnancy.

  • Men aged 13 through 21 years who have not been given the vaccine previously should be given the 3 dose series. Men aged 22 through 26 years may be given the 3 dose series. The second dose should be given 1 to 2 months after the first dose. The third dose should be given at least 24 weeks after the first dose.

  • Zoster vaccine.

  • One dose is recommended for adults aged 60 years and older unless certain conditions are present.

  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

  • Adults born before 1957 generally are considered immune to measles and mumps. Healthcare workers born before 1957 who do not have evidence of immunity should consider vaccination.

  • Adults born in 1957 or later should have 1 or more doses of MMR vaccine unless there is a contraindication for the vaccine or they have evidence of immunity to the diseases. A second dose should be given at least 28 days after the first dose. Adults receiving certain types of previous vaccines should consider or be given vaccine doses.

  • For women of childbearing age, rubella immunity should be determined. If there is no evidence of immunity, women who are not pregnant should be vaccinated. If there is no evidence of immunity, women who are pregnant should delay vaccination until after their pregnancy.

  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccine.

  • All adults aged 65 years and older should be given 1 dose.

  • Adults younger than age 65 years who have certain medical conditions, who smoke cigarettes, who reside in nursing homes or long-term care facilities, or who have an unknown vaccination history should usually be given 1 or 2 doses of the vaccine.

  • Pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate (PVC13) vaccine.

  • Adults aged 19 years or older with certain medical conditions and an unknown or incomplete pneumococcal vaccination history should usually be given 1 dose of the vaccine. This dose may be in addition to a PPSV23 vaccine dose.

  • Meningococcal vaccine.

  • First-year college students up to age 21 years who are living in residence halls should be given a dose if they did not receive a dose on or after their 16th birthday.

  • A dose should be given to microbiologists working with certain meningitis bacteria, military recruits, and people who travel to or live in countries with a high rate of meningitis.

  • One or 2 doses should be given to adults who have certain high-risk conditions.

  • Hepatitis A vaccine.

  • Adults who wish to be protected from this disease, who have certain high-risk conditions, who work with hepatitis A-infected animals, who work in hepatitis A research labs, or who travel to or work in countries with a high rate of hepatitis A should be given the 2 dose series of the vaccine.

  • Adults who were previously unvaccinated and who anticipate close contact with an international adoptee during the first 60 days after arrival in the United States from a country with a high rate of hepatitis A should be given the vaccine. The first dose of the 2 dose series should be given 2 or more weeks before the arrival of the adoptee.

  • Hepatitis B vaccine.

  • Adults who wish to be protected from this disease, who have certain high-risk conditions, who may be exposed to blood or other infectious body fluids, who are household contacts or sex partners of hepatitis B positive people, who are clients or workers in certain care facilities, or who travel to or work in countries with a high rate of hepatitis B should be given the 3 dose series of the vaccine.

If you travel outside the United States, additional vaccines may be needed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides information about the vaccines, medicines, and other measures necessary to prevent illness and injury during international travel. Visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/travel or call (800) CDC-INFO [800-232-4636]. You may also consult a travel clinic or your caregiver.