Draining Ear

Ear wax, pus, blood and other fluids are examples of the different types of drainage from ears. Drops or cream may be needed to lessen the itching which may occur with ear drainage.

CAUSES

  • Skin irritations in the ear.

  • Ear infection.

  • Swimmer's ear.

  • Ruptured eardrum.

  • Foreign object in the ear canal.

  • Sudden pressure changes.

  • Head injury.

HOME CARE INSTRUCTIONS

  • Only take over-the-counter or prescription medicines for pain, fever, or discomfort as directed by your caregiver.

  • Do not rub the ear canal with cotton-tipped swabs.

  • Do not swim until your caregiver says it is okay.

  • Before you take a shower, cover a cotton ball with petroleum jelly to keep water out.

  • Limit exposure to smoke. Secondhand smoke can increase the chance for ear infections.

  • Keep up with immunizations.

  • Wash your hands well.

  • Keep all follow-up appointments to examine the ear and evaluate hearing.

SEEK MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You have increased drainage.

  • You have ear pain, a fever, or drainage that is not getting better after 48 hours of antibiotics.

  • You are unusually tired.

SEEK IMMEDIATE MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You have severe ear pain or headache.

  • The patient is older than 3 months with a rectal or oral temperature of 102° F (38.9° C) or higher.

  • The patient is 3 months old or younger with a rectal temperature of 100.4° F (38° C) or higher.

  • You vomit.

  • You feel dizzy.

  • You have a seizure.

  • You have new hearing loss.

MAKE SURE YOU:

  • Understand these instructions.

  • Will watch your condition.

  • Will get help right away if you are not doing well or get worse.