High Protein Diet

A high protein diet means that high protein foods are added to your diet. Getting more protein in the diet is important for a number of reasons. Protein helps the body to build tissue, muscle, and to repair damage. People who have had surgery, injuries such as broken bones, infections, and burns, or illnesses such as cancer, may need more protein in their diet.

SERVING SIZES

Measuring foods and serving sizes helps to make sure you are getting the right amount of food. The list below tells how big or small some common serving sizes are.

  • 1 oz.........4 stacked dice.

  • 3 oz.........Deck of cards.

  • 1 tsp........Tip of little finger.

  • 1 tbs........Thumb.

  • 2 tbs........Golf ball.

  • ½ cup.......Half of a fist.

  • 1 cup........A fist.

FOOD SOURCES OF PROTEIN

Listed below are some food sources of protein and the amount of protein they contain. Your Registered Dietitian can calculate how many grams of protein you need for your medical condition. High protein foods can be added to the diet at mealtime or as snacks. Be sure to have at least 1 protein-containing food at each meal and snack to ensure adequate intake.

Meats and Meat Substitutes / Protein (g)

  • 3 oz poultry (chicken, turkey) / 26 g

  • 3 oz tuna, canned in water / 26 g

  • 3 oz fish (cod) / 21 g

  • 3 oz red meat (beef, pork) / 21 g

  • 4 oz tofu / 9 g

  • 1 egg / 6 g

  • ¼ cup egg substitute / 5 g

  • 1 cup dried beans / 15 g

  • 1 cup soy milk / 4 g

Dairy / Protein (g)

  • 1 cup milk (skim, 1%, 2%, whole) / 8 g

  • ½ cup evaporated milk / 9 g

  • 1 cup buttermilk / 8 g

  • 1 cup low-fat plain yogurt / 11 g

  • 1 cup regular plain yogurt / 9 g

  • ½ cup cottage cheese / 14 g

  • 1 oz cheddar cheese / 7 g

Nuts / Protein (g)

  • 2 tbs peanut butter / 8 g

  • 1 oz peanuts / 7 g

  • 2 tbs cashews / 5 g

  • 2 tbs almonds / 5 g