Burch Procedure for Stress Incontinence, Care After

Refer to this sheet in the next few weeks. These instructions provide you with information on caring for yourself after your procedure. Your health care provider may also give you more specific instructions. Your treatment has been planned according to current medical practices, but problems sometimes occur. Call your health care provider if you have any problems or questions after your procedure.

WHAT TO EXPECT AFTER THE PROCEDURE

After your procedure, it is typical to have the following:

  • You may have some abdominal pain and some discomfort from the surgical cuts (incisions). You will be given pain medicine to control the pain.

  • You may have some mild discomfort in the throat. This is common if you had a tube placed there during the procedure.

HOME CARE INSTRUCTIONS

  • Only take over-the-counter or prescription medicines as directed by your health care provider.

  • Keep incision areas clean and dry. Remove or change any dressings only as directed by your health care provider.

  • Take showers instead of baths until your health care provider tells you otherwise.

  • Do not resume exercise or physical activities until your health care provider approves.

  • Do not have sexual intercourse until your health care provider says it is okay.

  • Resume your usual diet as directed by your health care provider.

  • Do not drive until your health care provider approves.

  • Do not drink alcohol until your health care provider says it is okay.

  • If you have a catheter in place, follow your health care provider's instructions for care. Instructions may include the following:

  • If the catheter is connected to a bedside bag, make certain that the bag is always below the level of the bladder. Do not lay it on the floor. If you cannot connect the bag to the side of your bed, a small stool or chair can be placed near the bed for you to hang the bag on.

  • If the catheter is connected to a leg bag, make sure that you do not lie down with the leg bag attached to your leg. If you do, this may allow urine to flow back into the bladder from the leg bag.

  • If you were given intermittent catheters, use them as directed by your health care provider.

  • Follow up with your health care provider as directed.

SEEK MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You have redness, swelling, or increasing pain in the incision area.

  • You have drainage from an incision.

  • You develop bleeding or drainage from the vagina.

  • You have trouble with your catheter or the intermittent catheterization.

  • You develop a fever or chills.

  • You notice a bad smell coming from the incision area or dressing.

  • Your incision breaks open (edges not staying together) after stitches have been removed.

  • You have increasing pain in the shoulders.

  • You develop persistent nausea or vomiting.

SEEK IMMEDIATE MEDICAL CARE IF:

  • You develop a rash.

  • You have difficulty breathing or shortness of breath.

  • You have dizziness or fainting while standing.